NCERT In Text

What are the differences between autotrophic nutrition and heterotrophic nutrition?
Autotrophic nutrition Heterotrophic nutrition
(i) Food is synthesised from simple inorganic raw materials such as CO2 and water. (i) Food is obtained directly or indirectly from autotrophs. This food is broken down with the help of enzymes.
(ii) Presence of green pigment (chlorophyll) is necessary (ii) No pigment is required in this type of nutrition.
(iii)Food is generally prepared during day time. (iii) Food can be prepared at all times
(iv) All green plants and some bacteria have this type of nutrition. (iv) All animals and fungi have this type of nutrition.

Related Questions Life Processes

Fats are present in the form of large globules in the small intestine. The small intestine receives the secretions from the liver and the pancreas. The bile salts (from the liver) break down the large fat globules into smaller globules so that the pancreatic enzyme lipase can easily act on them. This is referred to as emulsification of fats. This process takes place in the small intestine.

The functional unit of kidney is called nephron.
A nephron is composed of a tuft of blood capillaries and highly coiled ducts. The tuft of blood capillaries is surrounded by a cup-shaped structure; called Bowman’s capsule.
• Waste material from blood are filtered out of the capillaries and they go through the wall of Bowman’s capsule.
• After that, the waste material and water pass through the ducts. When the mixture of water and other materials move through the duct, some materials and water are reabsorbed. This depends on excess amount of water present in the body.
• After reabsorption of water and other material, urine becomes concentrated. This then goes to the collecting duct.
• Urine from collecting ducts moves through ureter into the urinary bladder. From the urinary bladder, urine is expelled from the body as and when required. 

Plants can get rid of excess of water by transpiration. Waste materials may be stored in the cell vacuoles or as gum and resin, especially in old xylem. It is also stored in the leaves that later fall off.
 

Plants remain fixed at a place because they do not need to move in search of food. As a result, plants do not need to have locomotion, the way animals do. Moreover, most of the movements of substances in plants happen through passive transport; which does not need energy. Due to this, the energy requirement in plants is low as compared to animals.

Autotrophic nutrition Heterotrophic nutrition
(i) Food is synthesised from simple inorganic raw materials such as CO2 and water. (i) Food is obtained directly or indirectly from autotrophs. This food is broken down with the help of enzymes.
(ii) Presence of green pigment (chlorophyll) is necessary (ii) No pigment is required in this type of nutrition.
(iii)Food is generally prepared during day time. (iii) Food can be prepared at all times
(iv) All green plants and some bacteria have this type of nutrition. (iv) All animals and fungi have this type of nutrition.